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Heroin Facts
Heroin in its pure form is a white powder which is easily soluble in water.
There are approximately 84,000 heroin addiction related visits to emergency rooms in the United States yearly and about 3% - 7% of treated patients require admission for pneumonia, collection of fluid in the lungs, and other complications.
The average heroin abuser uses between 150 to 250 mg a day, divided in three doses.
The variability in quality of street heroin can range from 0-90%, which greatly increases the risk of accidental overdose and death.



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Drug Abuse InterventionEffects

Drug abuse intervention is sometimes necessary when someone needs help with a drug abuse problem. Drug Intervention could be the most powerful and successful method yet for helping people accept assistance for their drug abuse problem. Interventions can be done with love and respect in a non-confrontational, non-judgmental manner.

Interventions are difficult and delicate matters and it is important that they be done properly. No intervention should be undertaken without advice and counsel of a professional experienced in the intervention process.

The Steps of Intervention
1. Stop all "rescue missions." Family members often try to protect an addict from the results of his behavior by making excuses to others about his addiction problem and by getting him out of drug-related jams. It is important to stop all such rescue attempts immediately, so that the addict will fully experience the harmful effects of his use-and thereby become more motivated to stop.

2. Don't enable him. Sometimes family members feel sorry for the addict or tend to avoid the addict, let him come and go as he pleases. This comes across to the addict as a reward-after all, all he wants is to be left alone. Be careful not to reward by paying his bills, bailing him out of jail, letting him stay for free, etc. This kind of reward creates out exchange and criminal behavior.

3. Time your drug addiction intervention. If possible, plan to talk with the addict when he is straight, when all of you are in a calm frame of mind and when you can speak privately.

4. Be specific. Tell the family member that you are concerned about his drug or alcohol addiction and want to be supportive in getting help. Back up your concern with examples of the ways in which his drug use has caused problems for you, including any recent incidents.

5. State the consequences. Tell the family member that until he gets help, you will carry out consequences-not to punish the addict, but to protect yourself from the harmful effects of the addiction. These may range from refusing to be with the person when they are under the influence, to having them move out of the house. Do NOT make any threats you are not prepared to carry out. The basic intention is to make the addict's life more uncomfortable if he continues using drugs than it would be for him to get help.

6. Find strength in numbers with the help of family members, relatives and friends to confront the addict as a group but choose one person to be the initial spokesperson. It will be much more effective for the others to simply be there nodding their heads, than it would be for everyone to talk at once and "gang up on him." Remember the idea is to make it safe for him to come clean and seek help.

7. Listen. If during your drug addiction intervention the addict begins asking questions like; Where would I have to go? For how long? This is a sign that he is reaching for help. Do not directly answer these questions. Instead have him call in to talk to a professional. Support him. Don't wait. Once you've gotten his agreement, get him admitted immediately. Therefore, you should have a bag packed for him, any travel arrangements made and prior acceptance into a program.

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